Winter 2008 Season

Below are brief descriptions of Filmforum’s upcoming schedule. Full details about each week’s screening will appear on the main page of the site on the Monday before that screening. If you would like more details on any of the upcoming shows in advance of the Monday before, please email us at lafilmforum@yahoo.com and we can send you the program notes in advance.

Filmforum is on hiatus for the summer! Please check back later in the summer to see what we have coming up for the Fall season!

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Past shows:

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Sunday January 20, 2008: Films by Robert Nelson – A Retrospective part 3

Born and raised in San Francisco, Robert Nelson’s short films, characterized by their free-spirited humor, unexpected twists, and inspired setups, are among the most circulated of the American underground. This screening will present a unique opportunity to hear Nelson’s interesting perspective on his own artistic process – which is informed by his double background as a painter and a filmmaker. Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday January 27, 2008: First Sight Scene: New Works by Southern California Filmmakers

Started in 1992 and occurring for the first time since 2000, First Sight Scene is Filmforum’s celebration of the bounty of creative work being made by local filmmakers. This year’s First Sight Scene program emphasizes the creation of different kinds of spaces and reflects the continuities and breaks between film and video, the analog and the digital, the real and the perceived, documentary and fiction. The program will include films by Madison Brookshire, Eric Deutschman, John Cannizzaro and more. Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday February 3, 2008: The Floating World of Pat O’Neill – The first of two nights of films

Pat O’Neill is Los Angeles’s true avant-garde master, creating beautiful, moody films with floating mattes, variable film speeds, ghostly layering, wry wit, and masterful soundtracks, all working together to form a fractured almost-narrative, a reflection on the lost spaces and times of our city. We’ll be screening Trouble in the Image (1996), Horizontal Boundaries (2005), and Coreopsis (1998). Full details on show can be found here.

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Tuesday February 5, 2008: The Floating World of Pat O’Neill – The second of two nights of films

**At the Silent Movie Theatre, 8:00pm**

Tonight Filmforum inaugurates its new venue partnership with CineFamily at the Silent Movie Theatre. CineFamily has revitalized the Silent Movie Theatre, now programming experimental films, cult works, bizarre pop hits, foreign and domestic films in addition to its silent movie lineup. We’ll be screening Decay of Fiction (2002), preceded by Squirt Gun Step Print (1998). Full details on show can be found here.

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Thursday February 7, 2008: Ornette: Made in America by Shirley Clarke

**At the Silent Movie Theatre, 8:00pm**

This program is part of CineFamily’s Jazz on Film: Capturing Creation series. Jazz and motion pictures are two of our youngest art forms. Both developed at the beginning of the 20th century, and have seen rapid innovation and evolution in their technological, stylistic and expressive potential. This series takes a broad cross-section of the genre, from the 40s big band swing of Stormy Weather to the free jazz of Ornette Coleman. Come see and hear some of the best American artists of our recent past, bigger than life, and high on the act of creation. Shirley Clarke was one of the key figures of the American independent film movement, whose films The Connection (1961) and The Cool World (1963) both had strong jazz elements. Tonight we screen her final film Ornette: Made in America (1985), with music by Ornette Coleman. Full details on show can be found here.

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Saturday February 9, 2008: Portrait of Jason by Shirley Clarke

**At the Silent Movie Theatre, 7:30pm**

This program is part of CineFamily’s series The Black Imposter, which will present five fascinating character studies which illuminate an unusual and rarely seen figure in American cinema — that of the Black Impostor. Whether a hustler, a con man, an amnesiac or a woman who chooses to pass for white, the subjects of these films are people who, through chance, will, or sheer force of personality, find a leg up over the walls of white privilege. They are charismatic, charming and demonstrate exceptional social intelligence, but must also compromise some piece of their identity in their shape-shifting quest for fulfillment in a racist society. Tonight we screen Shirley Clarke’s Portrait of Jason (1967), a continuous unfolding monologue from dapper, effete ‘60s hustler Jason Holiday, who, with a kind face and supple voice, regales us with the compelling saga of his broken life, from houseboy to heretic, from militant youth to sassy gigolo. Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday February 10, 2008: Imagine the Sound by Ron Mann

Filmforum commences an intermittent series of documentaries focusing on avant-garde and free jazz, in part connected with the series of jazz films being presented at the Silent Movie Theatre. Tonight, back at our normal location at the Egyptian Theater, we present the Los Angeles appearance of the new revival of Ron Mann’s vital film Imagine the Sound (1981/2007), about free jazz from 1981. A marvelous film for jazz fans and documentary fans, it digs deep into the side of improvised music not yet touched by Ken Burns and Wynton Marsalis. Full details on show can be found here.

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Thursday February 14, 2008: The Love Tapes by Wendy Clarke (along with Casablanca)

**At the Silent Movie Theatre, 7:30pm**

What better way to appreciate Valentine’s Day than with The Love Tapes, conceived and collected by acclaimed video artist Wendy Clarke (daughter of filmmaker Shirley Clarke). For almost 30 years, Clarke has accumulated over eight hundred short videotapes, in which people share their personal experiences with, beliefs about, and definitions of, love. Each Love Tape is roughly three minutes long, and recorded by the participant in a small kiosk, with background music of their own choosing, saying whatever they want on the subject. On Valentine’s Day, we’ll share some of the cherished, revealing results, viewing not only a selection of Wendy’s own favorites tapes from years past, but new ones we’re making here at the Silent Movie Theatre. That’s right, this night is participatory. We will be hosting a kiosk in the weeks leading up to the screening to record new tapes, so members of our very own Cinefamily can be included. Filled with humor, tears, and humanity, the tapes create a moving, and, dare-we-say, lovely program. And then…if that’s not romantic enough…we’ll show the most romantic movie of all time…Casablanca!! Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday February 17, 2008: This Must Be the Place: recent works on displacement

Meditations on itinerant lifestyles, immigration, travel and memory, filmed in places as disparate as India, Queens NY, and Valencia.

Featuring The Garden City, Vera Brunner-Sung (2007, 16mm, 13:30 min, shot in Bangalore, India, and Valencia, CA)
Recordando el Ayer, Alexandra Cuesta (2007, 16mm, 10 min, shot in Queens NY)
Footnotes to A House of Love, by Laida Lertxundi (2007, 16mm, 13 min., shot in the California desert)
Lay Down Tracks, by Brigid McCaffrey and Danielle Lombardi (2006, 16mm, 61 min., shot in America, Bolivia, Sri Lanka, and Morocco)

Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday March 2, 2008: SHOOT SHOOT SHOOT: Works of the London Film-Makers’ Co-operative in two programs

The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative was established in 1966 to support work on the margins of art and cinema. It uniquely incorporated three related activities within a single organization – a workshop for producing new films, a distribution arm for promoting them, and its own cinema space for screenings. In this environment, Co-op members were free to explore the medium and control every stage of the process. The physical production – printing and processing – of a film became a vital part of its creation, and is what distinguished the LFMC films from other avant-garde work of the period.

SHOOTSHOOTSHOOT is a LUX project curated by Mark Webber.
Funded by Arts Council England, British Council, British Film Institute and the Esmée Fairburn Foundation.

Tonight:
Malcolm Le Grice, Threshold (1972, 10 mins); Chris Welsby, Seven Days (1974, 20 mins); Peter Gidal, Key (1968, 10 mins); Stephen Dwoskin, Moment (1968, 12 mins); John Smith, Associations (1975, color, sound, 7 mins); Gill Eatherley, Deck (1971, 13 mins); William Raban, Colours of this Time (1972, 3 mins)
(The next program is on March 16)

Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday March 16, 2008: SHOOT SHOOT SHOOT: Works of the London Film-Makers’ Co-operative in two programs

The London Film-Makers’ Co-operative was established in 1966 to support work on the margins of art and cinema. It uniquely incorporated three related activities within a single organization – a workshop for producing new films, a distribution arm for promoting them, and its own cinema space for screenings. In this environment, Co-op members were free to explore the medium and control every stage of the process. The physical production – printing and processing – of a film became a vital part of its creation, and is what distinguished the LFMC films from other avant-garde work of the period.

SHOOTSHOOTSHOOT is a LUX project curated by Mark Webber.
Funded by Arts Council England, British Council, British Film Institute and the Esmée Fairburn Foundation.

Tonight:

Introduced by curator Mark Webber (to be confirmed)! Films include:

Annabel Nicolson, Slides (1970, 11 mins); Guy Sherwin, At the Academy (1974, 5 mins); Mike Leggett, Shepherd’s Bush (1971, 15 mins); David Crosswaite, Film No.1Dresden Dynamo (1971, 10 mins); Lis Rhodes, (1971, 5 mins); Chris Garratt, Versailles I & II (1976, 11 mins); Mike Dunford, Silver Surfer (1972, 15 mins); Marilyn Halford, Footsteps (1974, 6 mins). Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday March 23, 2008: You Pick ‘Em 2! A selection of experimental films from Canyon Cinema
NEW LOCATION FOR TONIGHT:
Echo Park Film Center, 1200 Alvarado Street (at Sunset, northeast corner)

For the second time, Filmforum asked you, the audience, our trusty email list members, for your choices from the vast Canyon Cinema catalogue. Rarely screened classics, curiosities, forgotten wonders? Please note that we are NOT AT THE EGYPTIAN THEATRE TONIGHT, but will be screening at the incredible Echo Park Film Center.


Tonight we have:
Hand Eye Coordination (Naomi Uman, 2002, 16mm, co/so, 10min.)
Womancock (Carl Linder, 1965, 16mm, b&w/so, 15min)
Notebook (Marie Menken, mid 1940s-1960s, 16mm, color/si, 10min (24fps))
Hold Me While I’m Naked (George Kuchar, 1966, 16mm, color/so, 15min)
Some Manipulations (Jud Yalkut, 1967, 8mm (24fps), color/si, 3min)
Bottle Can (Luther Price, 1993, S8mm, color/so, 20min (18fps))
Dark Dark (Abigail Child, 2001, 16mm, b&w, so, 16min)

Full details on show can be found here.

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Sunday March 30, 2008: Southern California Video: An Evening with Allan Sekula

Filmforum highlights the work of four artists whose work cries out for more exhibition – significant pieces by fine artists of their media. Since the early 1970s, Allan Sekula’s works with photographic sequences, written texts, slide shows and sound recordings have traveled a path close to cinema, sometimes referring to specific films, sometimes, as he then described his 1973 work Aerospace Folktales,”operating like a “disassembled movie” while resisting the “dictatorship of the projector.” However, with the exception of a few video works from the early 70s and early 80s, he has stayed away from the moving image. This changed in 2001, with the first work the Sekula was willing to call a film, Tsukiji, filmed in the Tokyo fish market of that name.

Tonight we’ll screen Tsukiji (2001, digital video, 43 mins); A Short Film for Laos (2006-2007, digital video, 45 mins); Performance under Working Conditions (1973, video, 20 mins). More details to come.

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Sunday April 6, 2008: Heinz Emigholz: Photography and Beyond
Opening Night of a Week-Long City-Wide Screening Series with Emigholz in Person

For the past 15 years, the idiosyncratic Berlin filmmaker Heinz Emigholz has created a series of films documenting the work of certain 20th-century architects for whom he feels a special affinity. For the first time, five different venues in Los Angeles are joining together to present a week of events centered around this remarkable filmmaker and his Photography and Beyond series. Over the week, nine films from Photography and Beyond will be screened with Emigholz in attendance at Los Angeles Filmforum at the Egyptian Theatre, REDCAT, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the UCLA Film & Television Archive. Emigholz will also be featured in conversation with filmmaker and teacher Thom Andersen and architect, author and Schindler expert Judith Sheine at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture. Tonight we’ll be screening three earlier films from the series: Basis of Make-Up II, Miscellanea I, and Miscellanea II. More details to come.

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Sunday April 13, 2008: Heinz Emigholz:
Photography and Beyond
Closing Night of a Week-Long City-Wide Screening Series with Emigholz in Person

See April 6 above for more notes. Tonight we’ll be screening 2 beautiful architectural films and one of the miscellanea: Sullivan’s Banks, Maillart’s Bridges, and Miscellanea III.

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Sunday April 20, 2008:
An Evening with Carolee Schneemann

This program is part of a series of screenings of the work of Carolee Schneemann that takes place in Los Angeles April 20-25, 2008 at the following venues: Los Angeles Filmforum (April 20), REDCAT (April 21) and UCLA Film & Television Archive (April 25). More information for REDCAT and UCLA on their pages.

Carolee Schneemann has never ceased to cross mediums and boundaries to make work that resonates with raw poetic power. From her collaged war or diary films and provocative performances to her photos, paintings and installations, Schneemann’s varied creations deconstruct our ingrained preconceptions and everyday assumptions. In words, images and actions, her art is deeply personal, sharply critical, intensely expressive, and always innovative.

Tonight we will screen Kitch’s Last Meal (1973-78), along with additional works to be announced. More details to come.

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Sunday April 27, 2008: Southern California Video: An Evening with Steve Fagin

Filmforum highlights the work of four artists whose work cries out for more exhibition – significant pieces by fine artists of their media. We continue with artist Steve Fagin in person presenting two video pieces, Oliver Kahn and Zero Degrees Latitude. More details to come.
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Sunday May 4, 2008: Southern California Video: An Evening with Bruce and Norman Yonemoto

The third evening in our Southern California Video series features work by Bruce Yonemoto and Norman Yonemoto. These California-based artists deconstruct and rewrite the hyperbolic vernacular with which the mass media constructs cultural mythologies. Ironically employing the image-language and narrative syntax of popular forms, such as soap opera, Hollywood melodrama and TV advertising, they work from “the inside out” to expose the media’s pervasive manipulation of reality and fantasy. This show includes Vault (1984), Blinky (1988) and Kappa (1986). More details to come.
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Sunday May 11, 2008: Mother’s Day – No Show

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Sunday May 18, 2008: Noisy People, a film by Tim Perkis, followed by a live musical performance by four of the musicians featured in the film! Change of location – at the Silent Movie Theatre!

NOISY PEOPLE is a feature length video documentary that opens a window into a tightly-knit group of unusual sound artists and musicians from the San Francisco improvisational music community. Filmmaker Tim Perkis, himself a well-respected player in the Bay Area experimental music scene, followed his subjects for a year, filming them in their homes and studios, rehearsals and performances. What emerges is a set of funny and lively portraits of some very creative and quirky people — and a portrait of a way of life outside the commercial musical mainstream of America. http://www.noisypeople.com/ Ticket prices higher than normal to cover the musical performance : $15 general; $12 FF & Cinefamily members

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Sunday May 25, 2008: Memorial Day Weekend – No show
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Sunday June 1, 2008: Southern California Video: An Evening with Jordan Biren

The fourth and last evening in our Southern California Video series features work by Jordan Biren. Details to come. In conjunction with the Getty Institute exhibition California Video.

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Sunday June 8, 2008: Tearoom – a document presented by William E. Jones, with discussion following by Jones and Bruce Hainley

Tearoom consists of footage shot by the police in the course of a crackdown on public sex in the American Midwest. In the summer of 1962, the Mansfield, Ohio Police Department photographed men in a restroom under the main square of the city. The cameramen hid in a closet and watched the clandestine activities through a two-way mirror. The film they shot was used in court as evidence against the defendants, all of whom were found guilty of sodomy, which at that time carried a mandatory minimum sentence of one year in the state penitentiary. The original surveillance footage shot by the police came into the possession of director William E. Jones while he was researching this case for a documentary project. The unedited scenes of ordinary men of various races and classes meeting to have sex were so powerful that the director decided to present the footage with a minimum of intervention. Tearoom is a radical example of film presented “as found” for the purpose of circulating historical images that have otherwise been suppressed. More details to come.

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Sunday, June 15, 2008: A Tribute to the the Creative Film Society, featuring selections from the CFS collection and more

The Creative Film Society (CFS) was founded in 1957 by Robert Pike, with the intention of “consolidating the efforts of the individual West Coast film artists in terms of aiding closer communication of ideas, films and equipment, as well as distributing the finished works of the members.” The CFS was one of the key distribution organizations of the Los Angeles avant-garde film movement in its time. According to historian David James, CFS played “a major role in publicizing experimental film and in bringing the Los Angeles avant-garde film communities together,” and helped lay the groundwork for later organizations like the Los Angeles Independent Film Oasis and, of course, Los Angeles Filmforum.

The films screening tonight, selected by Angie Pike, include films associated with the Creative Film Society. Most are part of the CFS Collection. Although the CFS collection, now partially housed at the iotaCenter, once boasted the work of many representative West Coast filmmakers such as Curtis Harrington, Hy Hirsh, and the Whitney brothers, tonight’s screening will also feature some of the lesser-known works in the collection and beyond. Several of these were recently restored at the Academy Film Archive.

Tonight’s films include Logos (1957) and Odds and Ends (1958 ) by Jane Conger Belson Shimané, Things to Come (1953) and Obmaru (1953) by Patricia Marx, S.W.L.A. (1971) by Rob Thompson, Now That the Buffalo’s Gone (1968 ) by Burton Gershfield. Plus several more to be announced!

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Sunday June 29, 2008: Owen Land in person! World premiere of new works,
including “Why Do We Disrespect Our Genitals?” and “Undesirables
(Condensed Version)”. More details coming soon!

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Past calendars:

January-February 2008: flyer-jan-feb-08.pdf

February-March 2008: flyer-feb-mar-08.pdf

2 responses to “Winter 2008 Season

  1. lucille ferbel

    i would like a schedule regularly….

  2. lucille ferbel

    schedule please….

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